At home in 48 languages

Considering the advancing globalisation, it’s amazing how well we as a species communicate with each other. Experts reckon that up to 7000 different languages are spoken globally. The one with the widest geographical spread is Mandarin Chinese, which is spoken as a first language by almost one billion people. That’s followed by Spanish (400 million), English (360 million) and Hindi (310 million); ranked fifth is Arabic – spoken by 295 million people as a first language. German, with a little over 100 million native speakers, ranks tenth. But what exactly is meant by a native language?

Considering the advancing globalisation, it’s amazing how well we as a species communicate with each other. Experts reckon that up to 7000 different languages are spoken globally. The one with the widest geographical spread is Mandarin Chinese, which is spoken as a first language by almost one billion people. That’s followed by Spanish (400 million), English (360 million) and Hindi (310 million); ranked fifth is Arabic – spoken by 295 million people as a first language. German, with a little over 100 million native speakers, ranks tenth. But what exactly is meant by a native language?

A newborn’s first interlocutor is typically its mother. It stands to reason that it becomes familiar with what it hears from day one of its existence. If the baby’s wider linguistic context is the same as the mother’s, then its intuitive absorption of the language is straightforward. Researchers have found that children are capable of learning up to three languages by the time they reach puberty – those who have grown up bilingually or even trilingually have a head start over people wishing to acquire an additional language later in life. 

Although globalisation is leading to a decline in linguistic diversity – linguists think that no more than 100 or so languages will be spoken worldwide by the year 2200 – Switzerland’s four national languages contribute to the country’s sense of national identity and account for the particular necessity of its citizens to adopt an open approach in their dealings with each other. German is the first language for around 63 percent of Switzerland’s resident population, while native French speakers account for 22.7 percent. They are followed by Italian speakers (8.1 percent), while Romansh is spoken as a first language by 0.5 percent.

As a Swiss language service provider and translation agency, we at Apostroph subscribe to this culture of multilingualism within the country’s borders as well as beyond them. As we are fond of saying, Apostroph stands for communicating worldwide. 

We translate your texts from and into the following 48 languages (others on request):

Albanian, Arabic, Bosnian, Brazilian, Bulgarian, Chinese (simplified and traditional), Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, German, English (GB, US), Estonian, Farsi (Persian), Finnish, Flemish, French, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Rhaeto-Romanic, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Sinhalese, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish, Tamil, Tigrinya, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Uzbek.

Our highly trained and experienced translators are at home all over the world. They bring extensive expertise to bear in a number of fields across a broad spectrum of sectors, and take immense care when working on your translations, employing their specialised knowledge and applying their extensive know-how in all aspects of language and communication. Their expertise covers a wide range of text categories:

  • Corporate mission statements
  • Image brochures
  • Product catalogues
  • Expert reports
  • Contracts
  • Press releases
  • Publicity material and marketing tools
  • Books
  • Company histories
  • Scientific/academic papers
  • Legal texts
  • Certified documents of all kinds, including procuring apostilles
  • Company reports
  • Statutes
  • Staff/company magazines
  • etc.


By the way, did you know that translators contracted by Apostroph Group work only into their mother tongue? Our tested and accredited professionals translate within their areas of expertise and take account of your organisation’s terminology, corporate language (if available) and style specifications. This ensures that your translation is understood in the foreign language, but doesn’t read like one.

To make sure that your messages come through loud and clear, we select our translators on the basis of their professionalism, training and continuous professional development: we work exclusively with certified and experienced native-speaking professional translators, who are very familiar not only with the linguistic context of where they live and work, but also with its cultural nuances. They take account of regional linguistic differences to engage your target audiences more precisely, more effectively and more personally. Your translation, in other words, is written by a real person especially for you.

We also aim to delight you with a “certain something” by skilfully utilising your corporate language not only in the source language, but also in the translation. After all, systematic use of language across frontiers ensures that your company is perceived as authentic around the world. The consistent vocabulary, particular tonality and in-house linguistic style of your texts help define the identity and recognition value of your brand, products and entire company. 

Our translators – incidentally, we select our core language professionals in accordance with best practice – take account of your corporate language. The linguistic support they provide boosts the credibility and professionalism of your organisation and its messages. This helps reduce the error rate, and the consistent use of binding and standardised terms contributes to improving the hit rate for texts on the internet: your online products, services and information will be found more quickly and reliably, and search engines will rank them more highly – a substantial success factor these days! Not least, systematic use of your corporate language reduces the cost of a translation and all other linguistic services – proofreading, re-reading, editing, transcreation – since there is little or no need for time-consuming research, corrections and amendments.